Category: clinical medicine

Under the surface, health care leadership is a stagnant pond filled with ever deepening chasms between the two rival schools – clinicians and managers.  Clinical leadership is no longer about advocating for individual patients, especially about expensive interventions and hospital stays where there is little likelihood of these clinical decisions ever being substantiated by research. […]

Seasonal change often generates a flurry of diagnosing. It should be okay to be sad about the shortening days, rather than suffering from ‘seasonal affective disorder’. In women, a runny nose and a sore throat transforms into ‘flu’ and in men it becomes ‘manflu’. Once a diagnosis is made it is indelible. Escalation of symptoms […]

Receiving a diagnosis that we have a progressively debilitating disease such as cancer or multiple sclerosis is a lifetime sentence. Initial diagnostic tests can accurately stage the disease. New imaging tools such as PET scans, MRIs, and genetic testing can detect the extent of the disease long spread before it becomes evident to clinicians and […]

Our health care systems are dying under their own weight. They are morbidly obese. They keep on eating up our resources with a voracious appetite. Like clinical obesity, it is not a single problem, but a complex growth that arises from the interaction between our genetic make up, our bodies, our communities and the environment […]

Body organs are a valuable commodity. Nearly every part of the human body has been transplanted – except of course the brain. As the Western world struggles to maintain a charitable stance on organ transplantation which results in long waiting lists, a thriving market in live transplantation exists in many less industrialized countries. Expendable organs, […]

Hospitals are full of sick people and not all of them are patients. More and more staff in our hospitals are turning up for work that they are unable to do. They are present, but not working at their best, either due to health problems or other events that are distracting them or both.  It […]

Support medicine based on individuals; not paper. Encourage responsive practice; based on divergent thinking with the ability to converge when necessary. Commit to genuine funding for health, that is, ten percent GDP for ten years from government and private sector. Ensure that hospitals remain places for treating sick people, not making those who treat them […]